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calling for action to protect the environment. >> announcer: major funding for "religion and ethics news weekly" is provided by the lillian endowment dedicated to its founder's interest in religion, community development and education. additional funding also proved by mutual of america. designing customized individual and group retirement products, that's why we're you're retirement company. >>> and the corporation for public broadcasting. >>> . >>> welcome, i'm bob apper nathy. it's good to have you with us. in the wake of this week's series of events in boston, people of faith around the world have been offering prayers for victims of the bombing and for the entire city. president obama spoke at an interfaith service thursday boston's cathedral of the holy cross. >> you've shown us, boston. that in the face of evil, americans will lift up what's good. in the face of cruelty, we will choose compassion. >> we have more on religious responses in boston. ♪ ♪ >> at thursday's interfaith service, local religious leaders prayed for the healing of their city in the wake of the attks. >> w
to helman and nimruz province. very complex dynamic environment that we were operating in but before i begin it talk to you about the operational picture, i just want to give you a snapshot of afghanistan. when we got there i want to set the frame here so you understand what we're dealing with. afghanistan ranged 180th out of 1 86 on the world bank list of developed countries. 20 percent of the babies won't reach their first year of life. there is a 44 year life span for your average citizen. it has a less than 20 percent literacy rate and girls in afghanistan will marry by the time they are 15 and will likely birth their second child by the time they are 20. so this is the long-term effects of violence and civil wars within a failed state by every measure. the marines who are currently still in southwest afghanistan, they are surrounded by very conservative culture. in 2010, this is not true now but narco trafficking and helman province alone was the fourth largest trafficker of heroin in the world. the taliban controlled the region and this is the environment that the marines ca
that maybe one of the things that creates a sense of peacefulness in the social environment is that we have so many different religions and a first amendment that protects religious freedom that we don't have one religion rising to the surface or competing or two or three. well, one thing we wanted to do with our new version of beliefs and believers is to go to a part of the world where we do see more of the tensions between religion, and the spot we picked on, dare i say, was israel and then to some extent egypt. and we wanted to go to israel in particular because there isn't such a diverse cultural environment in terms of religion, so that the tensions are, in some senses, watered down. as we all know, unless you've been meditating in a cave for the past 20 years, israel and the social environment in israel is very tense in terms of the relationship between the three great faiths that actually share something of a cultural tradition- judaism, christianity, and islam. and so what we- we have an extraordinary opportunity, and something like a great risk. i'm surprised david ainsworth, our e
or given back to the environment through culture, through arts and through many of the hard work and we will unveil who will receive this dedication today. as many of you know trees are very important for our communities. they provide us shade, they deter water from going into our storm systems, they provide a place for birds and butterflies and of course they help us clean our air. arbor day is a very important event. it is celebrated not just in america, but all over the world and i'm honored that we are kicking this event. i would like to thank the mayor for bringing arbor day back to san francisco. this is our 8th arbor day. i will welcome mayor lee to the stage. >> thank you the dpw, the recreation department, to all of those who helped us in working today. arbor day, it is an annual celebration that we have struggled very hard to make sure this city appreciate because the trees are part of a great answer and solution to reducing carbon emissions and be sure we have greenery and beautification for our citizens. a lot of my friends celebrated chinese new years in china and this year
the virus grows, if you follow the metaphor that bullying is a systemic virus, then the environment has to change so the virus cannot grow and the only way the environment changes is if youth and adults begin to speak with one voice about changing the social norms that allows it to happen. it makes sense to most of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that
the endangered species t, it is not obeying the environment of national policy act. john: i assumed these people mean well, they are not evil. >> they mean well, but their priorities are all about the species and nothing about the individual landowners who are simply trying to earn a living on their land. this is an agency that has forgotten who they serve. they should be serving the people that live on the land as well. people and the animals can coexist and they can cooperate to do this, but when you have the heavy hand of the federal government threatening people of jail time and huge fines, if you don't do this, you will have all sorts of trouble. it creates disincentives because landowners do not want to help endangered species act if that is essentially going to be an economic death sentence for them. john: hence the phrase shoot, shovel, and shut up. >> that is the trifecta that happens on some land. some people do it legally, cutting down trees before they get old enough to be habitat for the woodpeckers. it is not good for the woodpecker, not good for the land, it is not good for the ec
past that meander up and down the park under pines and eucalyptus. hang out in this environment and you might see butterflies it, fennel, and then the lines. -- dandelions. is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. we have conquered the steps, we have watched the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view. this is a place to take someone special on a romantic stroll and enjoyed a beautiful look out. welcome to corona heights located in the heart of this district. it offers a view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. it is one of the best kept secrets in the city. it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. , bought a 37 bus to get there without any parking worries. for legged friends can run freely. there is also a patch of grass for the small box. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place to have these kinds of parks. that dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice of the wildfires that are on the grassland and keep your head out on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. be sure to take your camera and be prep
environments. i don't know if standing here today is hard to conceive that san francisco is the urban environment here on the west coast. one reason it's hard to conceive how dense it is is because san francisco is ahead of the curve of making it a transit system. we have a simple subway to follow. san francisco is going to continue to lead the way forward both on transportation and on sustainable urban environments. without question we are going to see these forward looking transit projects continue to propel the economics projects of the city and it's live ability and vitality. what we are seeing here at 350 mission, that represents an important milestone in the fulfillment of that transit center vision. as most of you know, kilroy has been the most active investor in san francisco these days and bay area over the last few years and we've done so because we believe in this city and we've also done so because we have immense confidence in mayor lee. it's no coincidence that under mayor lee and his administration that we've seen such technology growth, employment and vitality in this
better way to show that the puc cares about the environment and the puc is going to show everyone else, you can do this, too. and you can do it in a way that makes sense, that's affordable, and that is better for the environment. >> and this is the most energy efficient government building in the united states today, if not the world. and it is an example that the entire united states can look to and say, that's what we need to do to save our city hundreds of millions of dollars in energy consumption a year and set an example to everybody of how to save energy, to be green, to be sustainable, to be responsible. the city is leading the way. >> it will be immediately recognizable and iconic from various parts of the city or even if you see a picture. that's the sfpuc building. it's a wonderful building. ♪ ♪ >> in this fabulously beautiful persidio national park and near golden gate and running like a scar is this ugly highway. that was built in 1936 at the same time as the bridge and at that time the presidio was an army and they didn't want civilians on their turf. and the road was
the endangered species act, it is not obeying the environment of national policycy act. john: i assumed theseeople mean well, they are not evil. >> they mean well, but their priorities are all about the species and nothing about the individual landowners who are simply trying to earn a living on their land. this is an agency that has forgotten who they serve. they should be serving the people that live on the land as well. people and the animals can coexist and they can cooperate to do this, but when you have the heavy hand of the federal governme threatening people of jail time and hugeines, if you don't do this, you will have all sorts of trouble. it creates disincentives because landowners do not want to help endangered species act if that is essential going to be an economic death sentence for them. john: hence the phrase shoot, shovel, and shut up. >> that is the trifecta that happens on some land. some people do it legally, cuing down trees before they get old engh to be habitat for the woodpeckers. it is not goodor the woodpecker, not good for the land, it is not good for the eco
and behind the buildings. so one of the things that many of us here understand that the environment or what we call the climate influences outcomes but often times in public schools where decisions are made, climate and educational mandates are perceived as two opposite ends of the continuum, like when i have time and i've achieved my test scores and we've got everything buttoned up, then we'll get to the klie mallet. we've heard it from speaker after speaker, that conditions set the stage for children to leeb lean in and achieve. the good news is we can move bullying out of the front page not with more dollars but with more changes in our attitudes and our interactions. if more teachers perceive themselves to be call friendly and know the names of boys and girls in their buildings, part of it is reeducation that climate and environment and changing social norms is not secondary, it's primary and when we all embrace that then we'll begin to see the changes in the policies and the practices and we'll begin to get the results we want. we need to advocate for improving the social climates
't believe in that. we mean that every classroom, every school environment should be a safe environment where everyone is welcomed regardless of who you are, regardless of your ethnic background, sexual orientation or cultural background and we don't couple that with behaviors that kids will display. and the other thing in terms of context that i want to make sure is clear and i didn't am happy you're here and we are fighting a battle against pop culture and the messages they receive on tv, logging on to the facebook page, logging on to all of the social media that is out there, think how many times in pop culture they refer to someone as "their little b, or little n" and that's just the way we greet each other and for someone that entered school only speaking spanish and you think about the language issues and in spanish i can tell you a whole bunch of terms that people use to great each other that are so racist, homo phobic and have a length and accepted as accepted and we need to work together and we're dealing with a culture we are trying to shift and in san francisco we are proud
violence. all of your efforts. this started. eleven have always. some kind of environment. this case. many of them -- >> okay. first question, yes. a lot did actually have a lot of spin-off benefits. that is a lemon scent. because these laws were passed and there was such a nationwide applaud that the government began -- the parliament became open to the other laws. there we took the other laws that got past because of this one. and also, the issue is so tabooed, even the sexual assault and rape, and these issues are also so tabooed that now people are starting to even the president and prime master and the speeches of the anti sexual-harassment law. okay. now the world is getting very popular. so now it is almost creating a space where even in cestus coming out of the space. so rather than saying incest was it would not to run television a lot of sexual violence and sexual assault and rape is also coming, which is heated. fine. other terms. for example, rape, we do not have that yet. but we are coming close. when is that the case of the new york. we had it outside the un system. this big
to encouraging stewardship of the environment, land conservation, watershed protection and eliminating harmful chemicals. additional funding provided by: the colcom foundation. the wallace genetic foundation the e. rhodes and leona b. carpenter foundation. and by the charles a. frueauff foundation. this week on "to the contrary," first, environmental racism. what it is and does it exist? then, behind the headlines: poison in your sofa, called flame retardants. hello, i'm bonnie erbe. welcome to to the contrary, a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. up first, the climate justice gap. climate change may be a global problem, but the naacp reports it disproportionately affects women, people of color and lower income communities. that's why the naacp launched the climate justice initiative. >> communities of color tend to have these pre-existing vulnerabilities so that somehow when a disaster happens, there's communities that have you know poor housing stock or are under insured or are politically marginalized and all of those factors combine to make a greater vulnerabil
, and we need to make physical changes to our pedestrian environment to make them safer, to have shorter crossing distances, to have better and safer environments so that cars and bikes and pedestrians could all coexist and be safe. thank you president chiu for raising the issue of number of agencies are involved which is large, and i am glad there has been some improvement in coordination that i can only imagine what it was like back then because i will be honest i think we have a lot of work to do to improve interagency coordination around pedestrian safety improvements. i don't think we have narrowly enough coordination. we have some excellent people working on the issues in the various departments and in a vacuum they do terrific work but what i see over and over again in my district every time you try to do a pedestrian upgrade it's like running an obstacle course and you have different departments and objections and they're not talking to each other and it could be any person in that department. it's not always escalated to the top so it's a very disjointed process. where i see
. there is another program with the department of environment that we're collaborating with and we're hoping to address that issue. >> so, very quickly, moving on, just some quick lessons learned on how we can improve our program. again, parent caregiver outreach is crucial. we really need to reach the whole family, not just the students. and not just the staff at the school. it's really the parents and caregivers are key. and that regular walking and rolling events are critical in getting more families out there walking and biking. and, so, we want to establish these regular walking school buses and regular bike training either separately or together. what we're proposing to do with the cycle [speaker not understood] from mtc, there are a number of changes and a number of things we'd like to keep. first of all, we'd like to expand the program right now. we're working in 15 schools. we'd like to explain that to 40. this is the only source of funding that actually allows -- the only source of grant funding that allows us to go up to high school. so, we're going to propose -- continue working
into the environment. they have started work on a project to stop the contaminated water from escaping into the environment. workers for tokyo electric power company discovered three of seven underground storage pools are leaking. tepco officials believe pools one and two may be leak being the most. so they're placing priority on training them. on tuesday workers started transferring with 20 tons per hour from pool two to an above ground tank more than 400 meters away. officials say the process will be long. they plan to step up monitoring to make sure no water escapes during transfer. they estimate they'll be able to move more than 23,000 tons of contaminated water by early june. but the underground pools will continue to leak during the operation. crews will pump any contaminated water they collect back no the fool minimize damage to the environment. tepco officials say the volume of contaminated water is increasing by about 400 tons per day. they'll no longer use the underground storage pools and plan to install more above ground tanks. they're working on finding a way to decontamin
practice in the environments they're in all the time outside of school. >> and i would say that having listened to the word "media literacy" as far as back when i was carrying 3-inch quarter cassettes years ago and it was a great job. it really was. to teach media and digital literacy out of context is a fool's error and we have the boring curriculums in the world and teaching it out of the context. >> we have to stop blocking. >> yeah. i don't know. >> somebody -- okay. >> teachable moment. >> i hear everybody talk about -- >> thank you. >> yeah. so i have learned the phrase "teachable moment" since becoming a resource officer and i try to incorp rat that with a discipline situation and i try to use the teachable moment with the parents as well so you can move forward all together instead of just making everybody upset. >> i have some comments actually responding to what you asked about, the zero tolerance and different proposallity. one of my colleague and looked at this across the last 15 years and noticed a trend what we called "net widening and net deepening" and more behavi
out in this pleasant and quiet environment and you might see butter nice, and dandelion and is squirrels hundred dollaring for their next meal and buena vista park is 88 >> i want to learn more about it. >> social networking and e-mail. >> i want to know how to use it. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> divisional divide is a divide between those with access to use digital tools and those who don't. >> with young people, having computers and i just don't know. they're doing it fast. so, i want to know. >> not knowing how to navigate the internet or at a loss of what to do. >> we don't have a computer. >> we're a nonprofit that unites organizations and volunteers to transform lies through literacy. our big problem right now is the broadband opportunity program. a federally funded project through the department of aging. so, we're working in 26 locations. our volunteers are trained to be tutors and trainers, offering everything from basic classes all the way to genealogy and job search. >> to me computers, knowing how to use it. >> i think it's really important to everybody and possibly espec
are planning to continue to burning massive amounts of carbon into the environment, but rather ensure the safety of the communities and promote renewable alternatives. the city should be making investments consistent with the cleaner plan, support the public good. our pension fund should divest fossil fuels polluting our environment . invest in the energy sources of the future again thank you to supervisor avalos and the many richmond district residents and people throughout the city who have supported this. >> president chiu: supervisor cohen. >> supervisor cohen: as a public service announcement i want to bring attention that i am the board appointee to the san francisco retirement board. i will continue to carry your wishes on this board but i wanted to manage the expectations that this is a nonbinding resolution; a statement of this body asking and urging the retirement board, of which there are six other members to take this under consideration and also want to know is that there is a very thoughtful, but fairly long and drawnout process, the divestment process to begin this pro
environment that will make people want to work here. >> reporter: despite the competition, many of the visitors from japan became interested in coming to brazil. >> translator: the more i learn, the harder it seems to do business here. but i think brazil has huge potential as a market. >> reporter: the competition for labor is starting to spread into more and more rural areas in brazil. but that's unlikely to discourage japanese companies from investing in this rapidly expanding economy. nhk world. >>> let's now get another check of the market figures. >>> crews at the damaged fukushima daiichi nuclear plant in japan have started work on a project to stop highly contaminated water from escaping into the environment. tokyo electric power company workers discovered three of seven underground storage pools are leaking. tepco officials believe pools one and two may be leaking the most. so they're placing priority on draining them. on tuesday, workers started transferring about 20 tons of water per hour from pool two to an above ground tank more than 400 meters away. officials say th
continues its 30-year legacy of integrating art into the airport environment with the addition of five new commissions that are as bold and dynamic as the new building. >> this project was completed in record time, and we were able to integrate the artist's early enough in the process that they could work with the architect said that the work that is completed is the work that really helps complement and instill the space as opposed to being tucked away in a corner. >> be experience begins with the glass facades that was designed with over 120 laminated glass panels. it captures the experience of being under or over clouds when flying in a plane. depending on the distance or point of view, it can appear clear for more abstract and atmospheric. the subtle colors change gradually depending on the light and the time of day. >> i wanted to create an art work that looks over time as well as working on in the first glance. the first time you come here, you may not see a. but you may be able to see one side over the other. it features a couple of suspended sculptures. each was created out of a se
open space. our small businesses. our environment. we are all concerned about that as well. of course i must say about our housing authority as well. so we are taking on a lot of responsibility and because we are and because we are very busy doing the work we are. sometimes we need your input to steer us in the right direction for what things you think are important. so we are open to that. and we want to hear from you tonight. enough speeches. let's get on with it. may i have a couple words from supervisor avalos and farrell. >> thank you. thank you mayor lee, and yes, i get to make a speech too. i am supervisor john avalos, i represent district 11, just over the hill. i want to thank the mayor and the department staff for being here. and i want to thank supervisor farrell, the chair of the budget committee to be here. he's got a very difficult task. but one that he will have help with colleagues on the budget committee and we will be joined by supervisor cohen as well. i have talked incessantly of needing a budget based on equity, on neighborhoods and their needs. in district 10 and 1
to concentrate and learn. so a school safety environment is no. 1 and we know that when you have that safe environment it's backed up by respect and trust, students will learn better, they will attend school better and academically they will do well and socially they will do well. so socially we're very concerned about implementing at the ground level these laws tom has led the way in enacting. >> but there are a lot of people who don't think this is an issue, unfortunately, sadly. i know you are a big believer in this in mental health and good physical health and the link to academics. could you talk about that, please? >> all the research points to having a healthy school environment, having health in your life, many students, a quarter of our students in california have poverty, a quarter of our children have no health care. what was a million students a year and a half ago is now a million and a half. when you have good nutrition and good health, you will learn better. it goes hand in hand with good mental health and a good school environment. the research points out, we want our k
't also happen with the projects. they've taken a lot of time to benefit the environment and it will be a benefit to the neighborhood and to the neighbors with the view of their house. i really think this is a great design for a family house their maintaining what's there and they're asking for the variance to be maintained. i really support that project. thank you very much >> thank you any other public comments? please step forward >> good evening maybe i'm the last one we can all go home arrest i'm frank morris. my family as lived in this area for over 70 years. i've lived they're there for 3 seven years. tights real a shame we're here at this point. we all want our neighbors to get what they need but not as an expense to the neighborhood. first one was the variance that took the two parking spaces in their driveway sometimes there's 3 cars in that driveway. they were allowed to take the garage space and make that that an apartment. the second thing is the variance allows the building to be the highest densest on the block. i have 2 thousand square foot on exactly 4
consider very severe environments in case of a disaster which personally i think that's how we train and probably most of your environments. maybe you want to start from a place of more limitations rather than less and one of them is not doing that kind of coordination via cell phone. again, i think this was, last year there was a table top, this is the first time we're actually doing a drill. there's reason for growth and as bijon said, maybe next year we are meshing xhapld and control so command and control is done over the exercise com link and keeping it separate. i think the point is well taken that the recommendation i made, i think we can introduce more rigor into the execution of the com drills next year. >> any other questions? panelists, thank you very much, i appreciate it. let's give them a big round of applause. (applause). >> something that took place yesterday was our medical exchange. rob is going to give you a summary of how that went and at the same time we're going to bring up some additional panelists who will give us their perspective. >> so we're going to do a
together to have one vision and improve the physical environment and with that said supervisor kim i will turn it back to you. >> thank you chair and i do want to acknowledge we have a enlighten board of supervisors in terms of our understanding of pedestrian safety, and i think a lot of that also is due to a lot of activists and community members who made this a priority issue to educate government and members of the community on this issue and of course they have been impacted on this as well and hopefully through the hearings we can push and encourage for better working -- a better coordination amongst a variety of departments and this sits in a lot of different purviews so again i want to invite you up and chaired the task force and a member of the sf mta. thank you for being here. >> thank you supervisors. i am deputy of planning for the sf mta also the transportation task force, co-chair with dhp. i'm going to give you a quick overview of the strategy and then what we're going to be talking about in the hearing so you can hear from the various departments on what they have
response at the local level, and then herding all the cats that are in this pretty complex environment and trying to get them moving in a common direction. >> general baldwin? >> first, i'm very, very encouraged at the direction the department of defense has taken in changing the way that we do support the civil authorities. and the evolution, the problem that came out of the l.a. riots that were highlighted during hurricane katrina, we had two milltrix out there, the active force and responding. with changes in the law and changes in focus and direction we're starting to fix a lot of that and come together as one joint team to be able to better serve the people here in the state of california and the rest the nation in times of disaster. but there is work that needs to be done. first, we need to find a way that we can share capabilities that are resident within each of our organizations. as the commander of the army national guard you would think i know what forces are available in the army reserve in california. but i don't. i don't even know who their general officers are. i have no
different kids thrive in different environments. i did come away with the conclusion it's vital that parents, staff, and students come together against a shared vision of culture, organically or through the hard process of mutual dialogue and understanding. i think the book shows the success that happens when that occurs when that happens and the struggles that a school un if doesn't. as one example, one of the schools i followed which struggled quite a bit in the first year did have this one sort of amazing success on that point, the principle early on in the year introduced the school, the students to the wolf fable, and the fable goes that there are these two wolves inside all of us constantly fighting and one wolf represents greed and anger, and the other wolf represents love and humility, and the moral is the wolf that wins at the end is the one you feed. that really took on a life of its own at the school and among the kids and students and students told each other to remember to feed the good wolf or to make sure the good wolf wins in the end. i think at successful schools, you have a
. they are not on the water with dramatic views but we are on a park and that creates a great environment for the people who can live and work in this location, it feels like an urban campus environment and again, there say great precedence with washington square and jackson square and the best in new york with bryant park in the middle of manhattan, which is the home to a lot of activities and the people go there every day and it is almost a tourist attraction in and of itself. >> and this slide is an interesting one it comes from copenhagen in denmark and shows how housing can interact with the park. so that the people that are in the housing feel like they are in the park and the people that are in the park see the people living there and creates a incredible diverse and interesting environment. >> so jack mentioned how the parks and open space are going to create a central hub for the bay and water front neighborhoods and we feel the same way about the retail and the importance of the place making in the retail and the streetscape. and at pier 48 it will be the first step in creating the experience for
environment in africa is different than other parts of the world. i'm shiewfer that was a factor. some of the aircraft you're referring to are actually -- we don't want them in the inventory. of their sustain ability and capability. so, i mean, i know the analysis was done. i'm sure that it followed the rules of competition by the federal acquisition regulation. i don't know the ci think the am looking for here is before we do contracting as a default position on logistic, as we're, i mean, what i worry about in the sriing budget environment there's going to be more o tenden just sthat we should contract it out. because it's cheaper. and if afghanistan and iraq applaud anything that's not always true. and if you don't have adequate contracting oversight. it's not and especially when it's inherently a governmental function and we can spend a whole hearing tsh we -- we have many on that. i want to make sure it's a new day. as we begin to do new solicitation for new logistic support contract in any threat environment, there has to be a really detailed analysis done as to it is going to sa
with the environment in which i lived as a child. and i think i was right about this. ten years ago, in the fall of 1998, i gave birth to a child. i became a cancer patient at 20 and a mother at the brink of 40, which i know isn't how most people's lives are ordered, but that's how mine worked out. i am betting that in between my children's adult lives and my own, an environmental human rights movement will arise. it's one whose seeds have already been sown. i am betting that my children, and the generation of children that they are a part, will by the time they are my age -- they'll consider it unthinkable to allow cancer-causing chemicals to freely circulate in our economy. they will find it unthinkable to assume an attitude of silence and willful ignorance about our ecology. >> sandra steingraber wouldn't stay silent. today she is at the very heart of the environmental human rights movement that she prophesied. she's fighting to identify and eliminate carcinogens in our air, water and food, and to stop fracking, that controversial extraction of natural gas from deep beneath the earth. she is
in what we think is going to be an okay earnings environment, but a challenging revenue environment. not every balance sheet is going to execute equally in this environment. you've got some opportunities for -- >> what it means is the fed is going to stay the course on quantitative easing, basically. >> i think that is very clear. >> greg, tell us about this new study you're out with today. >> we found three in four americans say they are not more inclined to invest in the stock market now given the fact that interest rates are at record lows and the stock market's recently hit highs. that's the same as we found a year ago. now, a year ago, you know, in the past year interest rates have come down further. the market's gone up more. yet people are not swaying. >> what's their big fear? that they've missed it already? they're afraid it's too high? they're going to pick moment? is there too many risk? what's the big fear? >> some of each. quite frankly the memories of 2008 are very fresh. a lot of people, 2008 wasn't the first time they'd been burned. they got burned in the tech bust.
despair and poverty as well as the uncertain implications of the environment of degradation. meanwhile the face of technological change and the spread of advanced military technology to state and nonstate actors poses an increasing challenge to the united states military. this is the strategic environment facing the department of defense as it enters a third year of flat declining budgets. the onset of these these resource constraints hazarded lead to significant and ongoing belt-tightening and military modernization force structure personnel and overhead expenditures. you have noted some of those mr. chairman. it has also given us an opportunity, an opportunity to to reshape the military and reform defense institutions to better reflect 21st century realities flexibility agility. the process began in the leadership of secretary gates who canceled or curtailed more than 30 modernization programs and trimmed overhead costs within the military services and across the defense enterprise. the realignment continued undersecretary panetta who worked closely with the president and the joint c
crime and continue to create a safe environment and environment where we would not necessarily need to have this large investment in the criminal justice system. [ applause ] >> to mr. gas skon. if we were to eliminate money bail in effect turn over a decision whether or not someone is in custody to a judge whether or not they have been violator likely to reoffending or a flight risk, do you think that kind of system would likewise get accused of discrimination against the poor or racial minorities or do you think it would be more fair? >> i think it would be more fair. if you look at the fact that hispanics for instance are under the current system 4 percent more likely to be held on a pretrial setting than whites, 27 percent, we can show there is a disparity there. if we create a model that is based on evidence base risk factors that can be applied to the individual and the setting of that individual and can be done objectively not because an officer is making a decision but putting some kind of value system to those factors that are likely to impact risk. i think we are probabl
plant have started a project to stop highly contaminated water from escaping into the environment. workers discovered 3 of 7 storage pools are leaking. tepco officials believe that pools one and two are leaking the most. workers started transfers about 20 tons of water her hour to an aboveground tang nearly 40 meters away. they plan to step up monitoring to make sure no water escapes during transfer. they want to remove 220 tons of contaminated water by june. the pools will continue to lane during the operation. crews will pump any contaminated water they take back into the pool. the amount of contaminated water is increasing by about 400 tons per day. they will no longer use the underground storage pools. they're working on a way to decontaminate the water. currently only two of the operators are online and generating power. >>> a group of citizens have been waging a legal battle to shut those down, but judges said there was not enough evidence. >> the plaintiffs in this case hoped for a legal victory. now they're coming to terms with their loss. >> the court decision is really r
reflect environment review. dictionary tends to provide dictionary -- dictatorial [speaker not understood]. we the people have addressed so many times. [speaker not understood] education, schooling, work is based upon capital currency [speaker not understood]. monopoly capitalist, imperialist, racialist, [speaker not understood], surrounding planet earth sovereign nations with military basins defending its interests. witness 77 6 victory of african-american negro slave owners, declaration of independence, [speaker not understood] amendment of the constitution, fortification of the nation. this is such a timing for heart beat cloaked, environment review with this media entertainment, advertising industry, supernatural in party, opposition, an aura of fascist language, inflections, market speculation, 2013 pitch, who's who, mental health, george washington, and thomas jefferson, african negro slave owners, presidents, [speaker not understood] democracy dictatorship. 17 76, 2013, this reading given two minutes. >> thank you very much. before the next speaker, we have a 3:30 special commendat
that both leverages our economic success while preserving our environment and a complete neighborhood that is safer for our pedestrians, open spaces for workers. places to work that you can walk to and places to live, 30 percent which will be affordable for our residents here in san francisco which will ensure a diverse community in this part of downtown. we must improve and enhance our infrastructure which trul highlights san francisco as a world class city. i have had the opportunity to be more intimately involved in this process and i know you have done an incredible job. i have visited the tour and terminal that will improve our skyline. as a district supervisor for the south of market and district plan, i'm excite d that the existing residents will benefit from this neighborhood. i'm also proud to represent a city that is under taken such a large and complex project. mayor lee said we have to give thanks to our director, kaplan who has been our chief for years and to ensure a project happens like this on time. [ applause ] as an elected official i'm very sympathetic acknowledgin
that enhances environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looking at why this building came to be, in many ways it also included mayor
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